Friday, July 14, 2017

Book Review: The Millionaire Next Door

In a word, this book was fascinating. 5 out of 5.


In summary, this book was essentially a long stream of curated data distilled into a finely tuned narrative that I just couldn't put down.

At first glance, the title "The Millionaire Next Door" might sound like some trashy novel just begging for glamour and it's 15 minutes in the spotlight, but this couldn't be further from the truth. I assume most people, when they think of the world 'millionaire,' they think of a high class, high consumption lifestyle full of limitless indulgence. However, Thomas Stanley goes through great length in this book to show precisely why this isn't so. Through countless interviews and a vast list of data, Stanley pulls together that the average millionaire is anything but the cocaine-induced celebrity so often featured in mainstream media.

Quite the opposite, being an average millionaire is within reach of just about everyone. The American Dream is alive and well, but only for those who are willing to sacrifice.

It's kinda funny in a sense. This book put into words and data a lot of things I noticed growing up. I've always said that there are two ways to have more money: make more or spend less, and I prefer to do both. As it turns out, most millionaires feel the same way, and they invest their savings into appreciating assets rather than depreciating assets, like real estate and stocks/bonds as opposed to clothing and cars. The average millionaire doesn't reach such a status until late in life, and inheriting large sums of money more often than not dooms any developing child to a life of high-spending with few fulling achievements.

I could go on, but it's really pointless. In a way, Thomas is simply a messenger, presenting the data he found in an easy to follow format that drives home a list of bullet of points. However, despite this, I still found this book amazing and uplifting, because the message it presents is exceptionally hopeful and inspiring. Everyone should read this book, to help themselves and their finances, because there are no second chances when it comes to time and money.

No comments:

Post a Comment